My Digital Life: Peter Fisk

Welcome to the second post of our new series, in which we ask our lovely author clients to answer three questions about how they use digital marketing in their careers, and how it affects their writing.

This week: Peter Fisk. Peter is a global business thought leader on growth and innovation, customers and marketing. He is a bestselling author, expert consultant and keynote speaker, helping business leaders to develop innovative strategies for business and brands. Having trained as a nuclear physicist he went on to work with brands from Coca Cola to RedBull, Virgin to Vodafone, is a professor at IE Business School, runs his own innovation company, GeniusWorks, and features on the Thinkers 50 radar of best business thinkers.


What do you is think the most effective thing you’ve done in the digital world?

I wanted to write a book that was much more – had more reach, more longevity and more value than 300 pages of paper. “Gamechangers” was based on my curiosity of how companies win in the digital world, and 100 interviews with the most disruptive innovators across the world, in every region and every sector. How do they embrace the new technologies, the new markets, the new issues as businesses? What I got was a deep and constantly evolving insight into the fast-changing digital world. A web-based platform that combined blogs and videos, case studies and competitions, events and toolkits was the springboard from which I was able to launch the book. It enabled me to meet people more globally and actively than any publisher could, and to build an ongoing conversation with participants that embraced events, workshops and awards. The book is now physical and digital, more of a branded community, and has evolved significantly since its launch, with continual updates and new directions. Like the companies that it was originally inspired by, and continues to track – Airbnb to Buzzfeed, Coursera to Dalian Wanda – it has found a space to add real value in today’s hybrid and connected world.

How do you feel about the way digital technology has made it easier for writers to connect with their readers?

The ability to customise and collaborate, to build a conversation and ultimately a community is not new. But fundamentally different in the book publishing world. 4 years ago, I was invited to host the Future Book Forum, now held annually in Munich, and the biggest innovation workshop of publishers and printers in the world. Last year we had over 400 book people together, sharing their best ideas about how to take the industry forwards. As an author, I have learnt to think much more like a brand, to see the book as a mere catalyst, and to see the business model as much more significant that advances (no longer), royalties (trivial sums) and rights (still good money). The best crowdfunded books clearly show what audiences will pay for, with some Kickstarter stars generating over $1 million as they offer custom books to limited edition ego-books, dinner conversations with authors or corporate events. Similarly, linking to brand or corporate partners – aligning a fashion bio with a retail store, a sports handbook with a bestselling magazine – transforms the potential to promote the book (or range of products) to audiences, sometimes far in advance, generating advanced sales and reduced risk. The best form of course is co-created books, custom content that is more authentic and interesting, and word of mouth recommendation.

What’s the single best piece of advice you can give to other writers about the best use of digital marketing?

Digital marketing is all about rethinking ideas and networks. Its not just a promotional tool, but a way to fundamentally reinvent your book and your business model. As an author your value is not in bashing out the 300 pages, it is in having the idea. The big idea (which is usually captured in the first chapter!), that then catalyses a conversation, gets people thinking and talking, participating and sharing. Yes they will buy a copy, but more importantly they will talk to others. More than that they will want to be part of it, either by contributing their own insights and opinions, or by embracing the ideas more deeply through workshops or other activities. This is where value is created and real money can be made. Books still matter, they are the thought starters, and sometimes the enduring manuals. But more importantly they are ideas that become brands that become platforms that become communities. As a result they create impact – an applied action, a collective movement, sometimes even a force for change. Publishers are the ones who need to wake up to this opportunity, to work with authors and technologists to explore these opportunities. Today’s best businesses are ideas and networks companies. They have a powerful, addictive, important idea that is then spread through networks. Forget the linear world of supply and distribution chains that end in singular transactions. Think instead in terms of networks that multiply – social networks that engage more people with more trust, publishing networks that take your content further and faster, and technology networks that enable people to participant and engage more deeply. We live in an incredible time of change – time for authors, books and publishers to catch up!


Visit Peter’s website at www.thegeniusworks.com